MAJESTIC INDEX

This page provides an index of material relating to Majestic’s history, which is available on this website. Although this material is accessible from other pages, such as the Articles Index, it has been gathered here so that readers with a particular interest in this ship can locate the Majestic material easily. On occasion, there will also be identified external links included directing the reader to other websites.

rms majestic book cover

‘Mark Chirnside has once again delivered a book that not only tells a story, but also makes that story come aliveMajestic is no longer a mere footnote. RMS Majestic: The ‘Magic Stick’ is a book that fills the need for a comprehensive look at the White Star Line’s last flagship.’

Please click here for reviews and purchasing information.

 

RMS Majestic Notebook (April 2006)

A number of interesting facts and figures about Majestic’s life, including some rare images courtesy of John Creamer.


The Bismarck Files (November 2006)

In 1920, Bismarck was incomplete and the White Star Line, in conjunction with Harland & Wolff, hoped to have her finished as soon as possible. Edward Wilding was among those who reported upon the ship’s condition and prospects.


‘To The Editor…’ (July 2007)

A listing of letters that have been published in various maritime journals. This page will be updated as additional letters are written and published.


RMS Majestic Specification File (November 2007)

As the largest liner in the world for more than a decade, Majestic’s size was impressive. This specification file examines her dimensions and capacities.


RMS Majestic: An Interior Glimpse (November 2007)

Majestic’s career was all too short, yet in her heyday she was the most popular liner afloat. This concise article examines the magnificence of her first class dining saloon, for - like Majestic herself - it has long since ceased to exist.


RMS Majestic: Weekend Cruise to Nassau, 1935 (January 2008)

Shortly before she was withdrawn forever from service as a passenger liner, Majestic made a weekend New Year’s Eve cruise to Nassau at the end of 1935. She attracted 1,501 passengers, who were attracted by the liner’s comfort and luxury, but unfortunately the end of the line was a mere few weeks away.


Dossier: Majestic Model (March 2008)

Several models of Majestic survive today, including an interesting one at the Auckland Maritime Museum. Photos of several models, and the ship herself, are provided here with additional commentary.


Majestic Gallery (June 2008)

The ‘Majestic Gallery’ contains upwards of forty images of the ship: from artists’ impressions, to exterior photographs, interior images, brochures, deckplans and other material.


Majestic Tourist Third Cabin Accommodation 1929 (August 2008)

Following the decline of third class immigrant traffic, by the late 1920s the new tourist third cabin accommodation was proving very popular.


Majestic Second Cabin 1931 (August 2008)

After carrying second class passengers in tandem with tourist third cabin passengers for several years, Majestic carried her final second class passengers late in 1931. The original second class accommodation was then combined with tourist third cabin into one single tourist class, as the depression worsened and the White Star Line sought to keep Majestic competitive.


Majestic: Vedute in Terza Classe (August 2008)

An extremely rare brochure, printed in Italian, advertised Majestic’s third class accommodation in the 1920s.


Majestic: Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) (August 2008)

This extensive article examines several questions that are frequently raised regarding Majestic’s career and history, examining aspects such as her popularity, the passenger records she set, her speed, her size compared to that of Leviathan, and other matters.


Caledonia Dossier (February 2009)

‘Despite her relatively short lifespan, Majestic – the White Star Line’s largest liner – experienced life under three names. As she was launched, she was known as Bismarck – Albert Ballin’s largest liner to date and the largest in the world, ready to lead the German merchant marine; following the war, she was ceded to Britain and became White Star’s (and, subsequently, Cunard White Star’s) Majestic; and in the summer of 1936, she was given several years’ reprieve from the scrappers, becoming the Royal Navy training ship Caledonia. Her service in that capacity should have taken her right through to 1941, if not longer, but the fire of September 1939 caused extensive damage and led to her ultimate destruction at the hands of the scrappers in the early 1940s...’


Majestic Rigging Plan (February 2011)

An impressive profile of Majestic by Lionel Codus with Cyril Codus.


 

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